A Song For a New Day by Sarah Pinsker

This one felt familiar: after a pandemic and a series of terrorist attacks, America goes into lockdown … permanently. A strict curfew is imposed, and the population works from home, rarely leaves town and relies on shopping and media conglomerates for supplies and entertainment.

Yeah, that does sound familiar …

The story follows the lives of two women struggling in this world of isolation: Luce, the last musician to hold a concert before the lockdown came into force, and Rosemary, a young woman who’s never left home, but has taken a job as a talent scout for one for aforementioned media conglomerates.

This is very much a character-driven piece, doing a decent job of telling the story from two viewpoints. I preferred hearing from Rosemary to be honest, as she started off as a young girl living at home without much experience of life away from her parents farm. I enjoyed watching her stumble and grow as the story went on. I mean Luce’s story was great too, but since she’d been out and around before the lockdown, she already had experience of the “before time”, so I did find her side of things slightly less compelling.

The writing style is bordering on literary I would say, with a lot of the prose taking place in the characters heads. It’s easy to read with no rough edges to get in the way of a good story. It’s also not big on suspense really. The bad thing has already happened, so all there is to do is cope with it the best you can. That’s fair enough, but if you’re the kind of reader who needs to be drawn to read on, then you might struggle. But if you’re looking for a good character drama wrapped in great writing then you should give A Song For A New Day is definitely worth a punt.

The Quisling Orchid … in print!

Yes, I said I’d never do it.

The book is over 500 pages, I said. It’ll weigh a ton!

But y’know something? Until you have a version of your book in print then the job just isn’t done – even if it would be pretty expensive to buy.

And so here it is: The Quisling Orchid … in print!

The Quisling_Orchid_Book.jpeg

… And I’m chuffed to bits!

 

Film review: Blue is the Warmest Colour

Christ Almighty, this film is brutal…

I don’t think I’ve felt this drained by any movie that didn’t feature a single firearm or a car chase.

You’ve probably heard of it; it made a big splash at Cannes in 2013 for all the right and wrong reasons.

Blue-Is-The-Warmest-Color-Movie-PosterRight: it was a love story that was as raw as an open wound. (Yes, it was)

Wrong: some of the sex scenes sailed pretty damn close to hardcore pornography (No, they didn’t… Welllllll, maybe.)

Yes, the sex scenes were pretty full on, but to be honest they weren’t the films standout feature. What really worked for me was the superb acting from the two leads, Adèle Exarchopoulos (genius!) and Léa Seydoux Continue reading “Film review: Blue is the Warmest Colour”